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Sunday, 26 June 2016

Pete Rose

Peter Edward "Pete" Rose, Sr. (born April 14, 1941), also known by his nickname "Charlie Hustle", is an American former professional baseball player and manager. Rose played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1963 to 1986, and managed from 1984 to 1989.

Rose, a switch hitter, is the all-time MLB leader in hits (4,256), games played (3,562), at-bats (14,053), singles (3,215), and outs (10,328). He won three World Series rings, three batting titles, one Most Valuable Player Award, two Gold Gloves, the Rookie of the Year Award, and also made 17 All-Star appearances at an unequaled five different positions (second baseman, left fielder, right fielder, third baseman, and first baseman). Rose won both of his Gold Gloves as an outfielder in 1969 and 1970.

In August 1989, three years after he retired as an active player, Rose agreed to permanent ineligibility from baseball amidst accusations that he gambled on baseball games while playing for and managing the Reds, including claims that he bet on his own team. In 1991, the Baseball Hall of Fame formally voted to ban those on the "permanently ineligible" list from induction, after previously excluding such players by informal agreement among voters. In 2004, after years of public denial, Rose admitted to betting on baseball and on, but not against, the Reds. The issue of Rose's possible reinstatement and election to the Hall of Fame remains a contentious one throughout baseball.

On June 22, 2015, ESPN concluded an investigation and determined that Rose bet on baseball while still a player, from 1984 to 1986. The investigation also made public the existence of records of bets made by Rose on baseball, which had been seized by US federal authorities from an associate of Rose.

In 2016, Rose was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame.

He played baseball and football at Western Hills High School. Although Rose was small for his age, he earned the starting running back position on his freshman football team. When he was not promoted to the varsity football team in his sophomore year, Rose was dejected and soon lost interest in his studies. At the end of the school year, Rose's teachers decreed he would have to attend summer school or be held back. Harry Rose decided it would be better for Pete to repeat a year of school than miss a summer playing baseball. It would also give Pete an extra year to mature physically.

When Rose reached his senior year, he had used up his four years of sports eligibility, so in the spring of 1960, he joined the Class AA team sponsored by Frisch's Big Boy of Lebanon, Ohio in the Dayton Amateur League. He played catcher, second base and shortstop and compiled a .626 batting average. This would have been the pinnacle of Rose's baseball career if not for the help of his uncle Buddy Bloebaum. Bloebaum was a "Bird dog" scout for the Reds and he pleaded the case for his nephew.[5] The Reds, who had recently traded away a number of prospects who turned out to be very good, decided to take a chance on Pete. Upon his graduation from high school, Rose signed a professional contract.

On February 4, 1991, the Hall of Fame voted formally to exclude individuals on the permanently ineligible list from being inducted into the Hall of Fame by way of the Baseball Writers' Association of America vote. However, a longstanding unwritten rule already barred permanently ineligible players from enshrinement. Rose and Jenrry Mejía are the only living members of the ineligible list. Players who were not selected by the BBWAA could be considered by the Veterans Committee in the first year after they would have lost their place on the Baseball Writers' ballot. Under the Hall's rules, players may appear on the ballot for only fifteen years, beginning five years after they retire. Had he not been banned from baseball, Rose's name could have been on the writers' ballot beginning in 1992 and ending in 2006. He would have been eligible for consideration by the Veterans Committee in 2007, but did not appear on the ballot. In 2008, the Veterans Committee barred players and managers on the ineligible list from consideration.

On April 16, 2015, it was announced that Rose had been hired by Fox Sports to serve as a guest studio color analyst for MLB coverage on Fox and Fox Sports 1, appearing on the MLB on Fox pregame show as well as MLB Whiparound, America's Pregame, and Fox Sports Live. He made his Fox Sports 1 debut on May 11, 2015.

Rose married Karolyn Englehardt on January 25, 1964, and the couple had two children, daughter Fawn (born on December 29, 1964) and son Pete Rose Jr. (born on November 16, 1969). The couple divorced in 1980. In 1978, a paternity suit was filed naming Rose as the father of Morgan Erin Rubio. In a 1996 settlement of the lawsuit, Rose acknowledged that Rubio was his daughter.

Rose married his second wife, Carol J. Woliung, in 1984. They have two children, son Tyler (born on October 1, 1984) and daughter Cara (born on August 22, 1989). Rose finalized his divorce from Carol in March 2011. The 69-year-old Rose cited irreconcilable differences for the split, but his petition did not offer any additional details. Rose did not include a date for their separation. Documents in the filing say that Rose is looking to acquire all memorabilia and other possessions before the marriage.

Rose began openly having a relationship with Kiana Kim, a Playboy model, while separated from his second wife. During a 2009 interview, Rose discussed his relationship with Kim, stating, "My girl has finally decided to try to shoot for Playboy, and they were kind enough to give her an opportunity to come to Houston for an interview, and we're excited about that." A reality show called Pete Rose: Hits & Mrs., following the life of Rose and Kim, and his two step children Cassie and Ashton which premiered on TLC on January 14, 2013. Rose and Kim have been engaged since 2011. They appeared on a national Sketchers commercial which aired during the 2014 Super Bowl.

Two of Rose's children have lived public lives. Cara has worked as a television actress, appearing as a regular in the first season of the soap opera Passions and playing a recurring role on Melrose Place. She uses the stage name "Chea Courtney". His older son, Pete Rose, Jr., spent 16 years as a minor league baseball player, advancing to the majors once for an 11-game stint with the Cincinnati Reds in 1997.

As of March 2014 Rose earns more than $1 million annually from many paid public appearances and autograph signings. These include appearances in Cooperstown, New York, around the time of the Hall of Fame induction weekend each year; although Rose does not stay at the Otesaga Resort Hotel with other baseball people and cannot attend the ceremonies, many fans gather for his autograph.

Pete Rose inducted into the Reds Hall of Fame

"I've already cried on the field one time," Rose said on Saturday, referring to the time he got his record-setting hit. "That's enough."

The 75-year-old Rose kept his composure during a pregame ceremony honoring him as the 86th player to go into the team's hall. Many of his former Big Red Machine teammates - Hall of Famers Johnny Bench and Tony Perez, among them - were on hand to join in the humor and the honor.

Also, to say a few nice things about the Cincinnati native known as Charlie Hustle who became the face of baseball's first professional team in so many ways, with his gritty play and, later, his lifetime ban for betting on Reds games. His ban prevents him from getting into Cooperstown, but the Reds got permission to honor him in their own way.

"He's the most dissatisfied person I've ever known," Bench said. "Every day he was unhappy until he got four hits. He was never, ever happy with three hits. He wanted four.

"The greatness of this man was that he was never satisfied."


Rose set baseball's hits record with No. 4,192 at Riverfront Stadium in 1985 against the Padres, who also were the Reds' opponent on Saturday. When he reached first base on his single, he wound up crying during a nine-minute ovation from the fans. As he was introduced at Great American Ball Park on Saturday, fans chanted, "Pete! Pete!" and gave him a one-minute ovation.

"I can honestly tell you, to date, this is the biggest thing that's ever happened to me in baseball," the 17-time All-Star and 1973 National League MVP said Saturday. 

Rose was the key cog in Cincinnati's "Big Red Machine," helping the team win three World Series titles and was the World Series MVP in 1975. 

Pete Rose: Hit King, Legend, #Reds Hall of Famer.https://t.co/vN6jyzZD71
— Cincinnati Reds (@Reds) June 25, 2016
Banned from baseball for gambling on the game while he managed the Reds from 1984-89, Rose retired from the game in 1986 with 4,256 hits. He spent more than 18 of his 24 seasons with the Reds and thanked the Cincinnati fans for their continued support as he's still trying to receive induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.

Known as "Charlie Hustle" for his all-out play and headfirst dives, Rose told fans, "I wasn't diving for me. I was diving for you. I was hitting for you. I was trying to score runs for you."

Speech King. #Reds pic.twitter.com/j9W4p9gpFB
— Cincinnati Reds (@Reds) June 25, 2016
Rose said he wasn't going to cry as he did when he broke Ty Cobb's all-time hits record in 1985. 

"I've already cried on the field one time," Rose said. "That's enough."

Take a step back in time to September 11, 1985.https://t.co/MATnSZNZ3B
— Cincinnati Reds (@Reds) June 25, 2016
The Reds will retire Rose's No. 14 on Sunday, when they will also give him the red jacket worn by the other Reds Hall of Famers.

"It took 30 years, and the size has changed over the years," Rose said. "But I'm getting a red coat. I'm looking forward to getting a red coat."